It’s not English; It’s Twanglish

Some may call it Southern, some may call it redneck slang. No matter what you call it, say it with a drawl, because there’s nothing that betrays a Yankee faster than his accent. “But I can’t speak Southern,” you say. Fear not! There’s hope for you, yet!

Here at Real Southern Men, we understand the importance of language. Therefore, we’ve taken it upon ourselves to teach you the many-faceted language (languages?) of the South. It may look like English. It may at times sounds like English. Heck, maybe it once actually was English. But it’s English with a lilt, with a creativity of expression and of grammar that is uniquely Southern. It’s English with a twang, and we call it Twanglish.

Check back regularly, because we’ll post new Twanglish Lessons several times a week, teaching you the words, phrases and idioms of the New South. Stick with us, and you’ll be conversing with the good ol’ boys in no time!

3 Responses to “It’s not English; It’s Twanglish”

  1. My favorite example of Twanglish being misunderstood came from a German man who was visiting Birmingham for business. He had been going to a restaurant near his hotel for breakfast every morning for about a week. He spoke English – but not very well. He came in to work one morning chuckling. I asked him what was so funny. He told me that every morning that week, he had gone to the restaurant and been confused about our hospitality. Apparently the waitress had come up to him and asked him “would you like her daughter”? After many awkward mornings, he finally figured out that she was saying “Would you like to order”!

    • He shouldn’t feel too badly. I was in Germany once, in the foothills of the Bavarian Alps. The hostess at our B&B asked how I had slept. I was sleepy and needed coffee. Not understanding her regional accent, I politely replied in German, “yes.”

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Twanglish Trumps QWERTY | Real Southern Men - March 6, 2012

    […] QWERTY keyboard has outlived its usefulness, and we think Twanglish can make it better. “Of course it can, ” you say. “Twanglish makes everything […]

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